Sinners, Saints, and an Exploration of Lutheranism

This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for your support of kindism.org. I don't remember where I first came across Nadia Bolz-Weber's work. It may have been on Twitter, where I follow a wide range of people of various faiths and backgrounds, it may have been on Facebook where I think Libby Anne of Love, … Continue reading Sinners, Saints, and an Exploration of Lutheranism

the new Missionaries & Santa

The other evening as I was preparing dinner, three young women knocked on our door. They introduced themselves as the "new missionaries" in town and wanted to "share a message" with us. I politely declined, wished them a good evening and closed the door. They looked mildly surprised, but took my rejection well. Kid2, who … Continue reading the new Missionaries & Santa

The Slut Shaming, Sex-Negative Message in the Virgin Birth—It’s Worth a Family Conversation

I had Sunday School teachers who insisted that Christian Science takes the “inspired” word of the Bible, and that the stories were “allegorical.” The virgin birth story (inspired allegory or not) always made me a bit uncomfortable. See also, http://valerietarico.com/2014/12/09/the-not-so-virgin-birth-of-the-christmas-story/ on how Jesus’ birth became more virginal and miraculous.

AwayPoint

Christmas - AnnunciationThe birth story of baby Jesus celebrates the promise of new life, but for girls it also sends a harmful message. How can we acknowledge this without spoiling the rest?

Most Americans, even many who are not very religious, look forward to Christmas as a time to celebrate warmth, friendship, generosity and good cheer. Familiar festivities weave together stories and traditions from many cultures, which makes it easy to find something for everyone. But maybe it’s time to look a little closer at the Christmas story itself.

The birth story of the baby Jesus is heartwarming and iconic—the promise of new life and new hope in a time of darkness. It has inspired centuries of maternal art and is the best loved of all Bible stories. It also has a darker subtext, especially for someone like me—the mother of two daughters.

In the story, an angel appears to a virgin…

View original post 1,904 more words

what I’ve been reading: things that make me angry

CS prays for healing at http://www.tampabay.com/news/health/linda-osmundson-casa-director-and-christian-scientist-prays-for-healing/2206547 Why does God Kill So Many Children in Idaho? at https://www.vocativ.com/culture/religion/faith-healing-deaths/?page=all Birthing Book Linked to Death of Baby at  http://www.theragblog.com/metro-lamar-w-hankins-birthing-book-linked-to-death-of-pursley-baby-in-east-texas-cult/ Religious Freedom vs. Child Protection at http://www.csicop.org/si/show/faith_healing_religious_freedom_vs._child_protection

what their itching ears want to hear – new wine-old bottles, Mary Baker Eddy & Luke 5:36-39

Back in May, when I wrote about Ms. Eddy and alcohol, I came across a parable that was largely overlooked by my Sunday School teachers, it comes from Luke 5:36-39 and it talks about wine. "And he spake also a parable unto them; No man putteth a piece of a new garment upon an old; if … Continue reading what their itching ears want to hear – new wine-old bottles, Mary Baker Eddy & Luke 5:36-39

Psychological Harms of Bible-Believing Christianity

Before you go jumping up and down screaming “that’s not Christian Science” take a step or two back and go re-read my blog and the blogs/books/articles of others who have left. Christian Science qualifies, they just use different language to manipulate.

AwayPoint

depressionBy Marlene Winell and Valerie Tarico

“I am 30 years old and I am struggling to find sanity. Between the Christian schools, homeschooling, the Christian group home (indoctrinating work camp) and different churches in different cities, I am a psychological, emotional and spiritual mess.”   –A former Evangelical

If a former believer says that Christianity made her depressed, obsessive, or post-traumatic, she is likely to be dismissed as an exaggerator. She might describe panic attacks about the rapture; moods that swung from ecstasy about God’s overwhelming love to suicidal self-loathing about repeated sins; or an obsession with sexual purity.

A symptom like one of these clearly has a religious component, yet many people instinctively blame the victim. They will say that the wounded former believer was prone to anxiety or depression or obsession in the first place—that his Christianity somehow got corrupted by his predisposition to psychological problems. Or they will say…

View original post 2,787 more words