Inspiration Link Dump (3) – Mark Twain & the Movies

Every now and then I get inspired to research a topic and then when I get around to writing the blog post the inspiration flees, leaving me with a post of links and background information that is unlikely to ever make it onto a blog post. "Inspiration Link Dumps" are things that I looked into, but never … Continue reading Inspiration Link Dump (3) – Mark Twain & the Movies

Inspiration Link Dump (2) – Miranda Rice & the Wikipedia Edits

Every now and then I get inspired to research a topic and then when I get around to writing the blog post the inspiration flees, leaving me with a post of links and background information that is unlikely to ever make it onto a blog post. "Inspiration Link Dumps" are things that I looked into, but never … Continue reading Inspiration Link Dump (2) – Miranda Rice & the Wikipedia Edits

go do gratitude

I’m reclaiming “gratitude” from its saccharine Christian Science use. Lets ignore the bad grammar and do gratitude.

Atheopaganism

This is the third installment of a 13-part series exploring the Atheopagan Principles, as described in my essay “Godless Heathen“. To read the whole series, click the tag “Atheopagan Principles” in the tag cloud at right.

Principle 3 of Atheopaganism is, I am grateful. But constraints of language make even this seemingly simple concept obscure and confusing. Grateful for what? When? All the time? How is that possible?

This is because “grateful” is an adjective, and as such appears to describe a quality to characterize a person: Bob is red-haired, blue-eyed, right-handed, and grateful. Right?

The way the English language addresses gratitude implies that it is something you either are or aren’t, like being tone deaf or French or coffee-colored. But that isn’t correct.

Gratitude is something you do. If it weren’t bad English, Principle 3 would be, “I DO gratitude”.

Gratitude is a way of filtering and interpreting information…

View original post 515 more words

The Slut Shaming, Sex-Negative Message in the Virgin Birth—It’s Worth a Family Conversation

I had Sunday School teachers who insisted that Christian Science takes the “inspired” word of the Bible, and that the stories were “allegorical.” The virgin birth story (inspired allegory or not) always made me a bit uncomfortable. See also, http://valerietarico.com/2014/12/09/the-not-so-virgin-birth-of-the-christmas-story/ on how Jesus’ birth became more virginal and miraculous.

AwayPoint

Christmas - AnnunciationThe birth story of baby Jesus celebrates the promise of new life, but for girls it also sends a harmful message. How can we acknowledge this without spoiling the rest?

Most Americans, even many who are not very religious, look forward to Christmas as a time to celebrate warmth, friendship, generosity and good cheer. Familiar festivities weave together stories and traditions from many cultures, which makes it easy to find something for everyone. But maybe it’s time to look a little closer at the Christmas story itself.

The birth story of the baby Jesus is heartwarming and iconic—the promise of new life and new hope in a time of darkness. It has inspired centuries of maternal art and is the best loved of all Bible stories. It also has a darker subtext, especially for someone like me—the mother of two daughters.

In the story, an angel appears to a virgin…

View original post 1,904 more words